Difference between revisions of "Market Street Between 9th and 10th and a Cursed Highrise"

 
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[[Image:tendrnob$fox-plaza.jpg]]
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'''<font face = arial light> <font color = maroon> <font size = 3>Unfinished History</font></font> </font>'''
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[[Image:tendrnob$fox-plaza.jpg|420px]]
  
 
'''The Fox Plaza building on Market Street between 9th and 10th, mid-1990s.'''
 
'''The Fox Plaza building on Market Street between 9th and 10th, mid-1990s.'''
  
Fox Plaza, 1390 Market Street.
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<font size=4>Fox Plaza, 1390 Market Street.</font>
  
The [[Aerial midtown 1920s |Fox Theater]] was America's greatest all-time movie palace. Occupying the entire block bounded by Market, Hayes, and Polk Streets, it harbored 4,561 seats surrounded by the ultimate in classic movie-house opulence. It's gigantic neon sign spelled out F-O-X in letters big enough to be read from the Ferry Building at the end of Market Street. But in 1963, real estate philistines bought the property, tore down the most magnificent building in San Francisco, and erected a high-rise eyesore in its place.
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The [[Fox Theater |Fox Theater]] was America's greatest all-time movie palace. Occupying the entire block bounded by Market, Hayes, and Polk Streets, it harbored 4,561 seats surrounded by the ultimate in classic movie-house opulence. It's gigantic neon sign spelled out F-O-X in letters big enough to be read from the Ferry Building at the end of Market Street.  
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[[Image:Fox theater AAA-8740.jpg]]
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[[Image:Foxtrtr02.jpg]]
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''Photos: San Francisco History Center, SF Public Library''
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[[Image:Market-and-9th-north-March-28-1930-SFDPW.jpg|720px]]
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'''Market and 9th Street northerly view, March 28, 1930.'''
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''Photo: SFDPW, courtesy C.R. collection''
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[[Image:Polk-St-south-across-Market-to-10th-St-July-2-1937-SFDPW.jpg|720px]]
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'''South across Market to 10th Street from Polk Street, July 2, 1937.'''
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''Photo: SFDPW, courtesy C.R. collection''
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But in 1963, real estate philistines bought the property, tore down the most magnificent building in San Francisco, and erected a high-rise eyesore in its place.
  
 
Plenty of San Franciscans cursed the idiocy of those responsible. But one San Franciscan went further. On the night of the Fox Theater's final show, as the dying Wurlitzer cords echoed through the cavernous theater, future Satanist leader Anton LaVey, then the Fox organist, thundered out a formal imprecation against the owners and the property. Since then, the building is said to have experienced problem after problem, and is believed by many to be cursed.
 
Plenty of San Franciscans cursed the idiocy of those responsible. But one San Franciscan went further. On the night of the Fox Theater's final show, as the dying Wurlitzer cords echoed through the cavernous theater, future Satanist leader Anton LaVey, then the Fox organist, thundered out a formal imprecation against the owners and the property. Since then, the building is said to have experienced problem after problem, and is believed by many to be cursed.
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''--Dr. Weirde''
 
''--Dr. Weirde''
  
[[Ken Dowlin: Book Dumper |Prev. Document]] [[Russian Hill Hangings |Next Document]]
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[[Image:MA7E28~1.JPG|800px]]
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'''Market and 10th c 1890. This was the entrance to the Panorama Building at 1331 Market Street, built in 1887. It led to a huge circular drum in the rear of the lot where 360 degree paintings of dramatic historical events were on view, the so-called Cyclorama being a precursor to cinema.'''
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''Photo: OpenSFHistory.org, wnp67.0131''
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[[Ken Dowlin: Book Dumper |Prev. Document]]     [[Fox Theater |Next Document]]
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[[category:TenderNob]] [[category:Civic Center]] [[category:buildings]] [[category:1990s]] [[category:Famous characters]] [[category:1930s]]

Latest revision as of 21:12, 25 December 2021

Unfinished History

Tendrnob$fox-plaza.jpg

The Fox Plaza building on Market Street between 9th and 10th, mid-1990s.

Fox Plaza, 1390 Market Street.

The Fox Theater was America's greatest all-time movie palace. Occupying the entire block bounded by Market, Hayes, and Polk Streets, it harbored 4,561 seats surrounded by the ultimate in classic movie-house opulence. It's gigantic neon sign spelled out F-O-X in letters big enough to be read from the Ferry Building at the end of Market Street.

Fox theater AAA-8740.jpg

Foxtrtr02.jpg

Photos: San Francisco History Center, SF Public Library

Market-and-9th-north-March-28-1930-SFDPW.jpg

Market and 9th Street northerly view, March 28, 1930.

Photo: SFDPW, courtesy C.R. collection

Polk-St-south-across-Market-to-10th-St-July-2-1937-SFDPW.jpg

South across Market to 10th Street from Polk Street, July 2, 1937.

Photo: SFDPW, courtesy C.R. collection

But in 1963, real estate philistines bought the property, tore down the most magnificent building in San Francisco, and erected a high-rise eyesore in its place.

Plenty of San Franciscans cursed the idiocy of those responsible. But one San Franciscan went further. On the night of the Fox Theater's final show, as the dying Wurlitzer cords echoed through the cavernous theater, future Satanist leader Anton LaVey, then the Fox organist, thundered out a formal imprecation against the owners and the property. Since then, the building is said to have experienced problem after problem, and is believed by many to be cursed.

--Dr. Weirde

MA7E28~1.JPG

Market and 10th c 1890. This was the entrance to the Panorama Building at 1331 Market Street, built in 1887. It led to a huge circular drum in the rear of the lot where 360 degree paintings of dramatic historical events were on view, the so-called Cyclorama being a precursor to cinema.

Photo: OpenSFHistory.org, wnp67.0131

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